Bee Fun

Grab your crayons and BEE creative.



Fun Bee Facts:

  • Bees work hard all summer to ensure they’ll have enough honey to sustain the hive through the winter. During the colder months, bees occupy their time by clustering themselves around the queen and shivering their bodies to fill the hive with warmth. All that shivering burns a lot of calories, so honey makes for the perfect high-energy diet.

  • A typical beehive can produce anywhere from 30 to 100 pounds of honey a year. To produce a single pound of honey, a colony of bees must collect nectar from approximately 2 million flowers and fly over 55,000 miles. This amounts to a lifetime’s worth of work for around 800 bees.

  • A colony of honey bees in early spring can have approximately 10,000-15,000 bees.

  • Honey ranges in colour from water white through to dark brown/black. Most Canadian honey is white in colour, which has a mild but sweet taste.

  • A honeybee can fly about 24 km/h or 15 mph.

  • Honeybees communicate with each other by dancing. Honeybees do a dance which alerts other bees where nectar and pollen is located. The dance explains direction and distance.

Download and Print Colouring Page:

Bee colouring
.pdf
Download PDF • 818KB

Sources:

https://honeycouncil.ca/industry-overview/bee-facts/

https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/68528/15-honey-facts-worth-buzzing-about

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